Nirmala December 17, 2017

1. Ghugni :

It is a preparation made of black grams soaked (either lightly/overnight)in water and then sauted in mustard oil in a wok. All kinds of garam masala made as paste on a sil is used for flavouring and chana is also ground to form a paste used as thickener. This thickens the masala and makes gravy as per desire. After proper seasoning and bhunjana water is added to the mix for gravy as desired.Ghugni is an evening snack in Eastern India (Assam, Bengal, Bihar, Orissa). Black gram (Kala Chana) or dried yellow peas or dried white peas is cooked with gravy, in the traditional eastern Indian style. It is then served with kurmura (puffed rice), and at times with hot onion pakoda/bhajiya.

2. Roti :

Roti is generally an Indian bread, made from stoneground wholemeal flour, traditionally known as atta flour, that originated and is consumed in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. It is also consumed in parts of South Africa, the southern Caribbean, particularly in Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, and Suriname, and Fiji. Its defining characteristic is that it is unleavened. Indian naan bread, by contrast, is a yeast-leavened bread. A kulcha in Indian cuisine is a bread-like accompaniment, made of processed flour (Maida) leavened with yeast.

3. Tilkut :

Tilkut is a sweet savoury made in the Indian states of Bihar and Jharkhand. This is also known as Tilkatri. It is made of pounded tila or sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum) and jaggery or sugar. The best tilkut is said to be from Gaya. References to this dry sweet is found in the Buddhist literature as palala.Normally, three types of tilkuts are available the sugar tilkut is white in colour, the sakkar tilkut is made of unrefined sugar and is light brown in colour and the gur tilkut is made of jaggery and is dark brown in colour. Each of these varieties have their own flavour. However, the white variety made of sugar is more popular and the popularity of the other two varieties is declining. The circular shaped savoury is called tilkut and the smaller nut-sized ones are called tillouri.Winter is the period when sugar cane is harvested. It is also the period when large quantities of tilkut are made in many towns and even villages. However, as the demand persists throughout the year, smaller quantities are made round the year.

4. Dhuska :

A deep fried item prepared from a mixture of powdered rice and ghee but is salted.

5. Kadhi Bari :

these fried soft dumplings made of besan (gram flour) are cooked in a spicy gravy of yogurt and besan. It goes well over plain rice. India has a variety of kadhis, from different parts of the country. The Bihari kadhi is a one that uses badi (pakoda) dumplings. It is considered inauspicious in Bihar to prepare plain kadhi without any dumplings.For the badi, you need: a cup of gram flour (besan), chopped green chillies, asafoetida (hing), baking powder, oil for frying, and salt.For the kadhi, you need: two tablespoons of besan, a cup of thick curd, a couple of red chillies, black mustard seeds, curry leaves, asafoetida, half a teaspoon of chopped ginger (optional), a tablespoon of oil and salt.

6. Bharwan karela :

This is a traditional and authentic bharwa karela recipe from Uttar Pradesh.We follow this same recipe from generations in my community and my household. Addition of raw mangoes and fennel powder make it different and special .Try this you will surely love this.

7. Gulab jamun :

Gulab jamun is a milk-solids -based dessert, similar to a dumpling, popular in countries of the South Asian Subcontinent such as India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Pakistan and Bangladesh, also in the Caribbean countries of Trinidad, Guyana, Suriname and Jamaica and in Mauritius. In Nepal it is widely known as Lal-Mohan, served with or without yogurt. It is made mainly from milk solids, traditionally from freshly curdled milk. In India, milk solids are prepared by heating milk over a low flame for a long time until most of the water content has evaporated. These milks solids, known as khoya in Pakistan and India, are kneaded into a dough, sometimes with a pinch of flour, and then shaped into small balls and deep fried at a low temperature of about 148