Nirmala October 25, 2019

1. Peda :

Peda, Pheda or Pera is a sweet from the Indian subcontinent, usually prepared in thick, semi-soft pieces. The main ingredients are khoa, sugar and traditional flavorings, including cardamom seeds, pistachio nuts and saffron. The colour varies from a creamy white to a caramel colour. The word pera is also generically used to mean a blob of any doughy substance, such as flour or (in the case of the sweet) khoa. Origin of Peda may be credited to the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, and the variety from the city of Mathura in that state was considered to be the best. Simultaneously, another origin, practice of Peda making, some unique varieties, and spread of this tradition may be attributed to the province of Saurashtra of Gujarat and its centers like Sihor, Rajkot, Palitana and Bhavnagar as well. Tradition and practice of Peda making can be traced back to late 1800s in Sihor while it picking up momentum in 20th century. Along with Rajkot and Bhavnagar now, there are several distinct varieties of Peda, originating from different centres of Saurashtra (region). In Gujarat, Pedas are called and pronounced as Penda

2. Kofta :

Kofta (see section Name for other names) is an Iranian, Middle Eastern, Indian and Balkan meatball or meatloaf. In the simplest form, koftas consist of balls of minced or ground meat usually beef or lamb mixed with spices and/or onions. In India, Turkey and Iran, koftas are usually made of lamb, beef, mutton or chicken, whereas Greek and Cypriot varieties are usually made of beef, veal, pork or mixtures of them. They are often shaped into meatballs which are prepared with a mixture of ground meat, rice and leeks, and served dry. In India, vegetarian varieties, like lauki kofta and shahi aloo kofta, are popular, as religious beliefs generally forbid consumption of meat. In Iran, Balochistan and Pakistan, koftas are served with a spiced gravy, as dry versions are considered to be kebabs. Shrimp and fish koftas are found in South India, West Bengal, Bangladesh and in some parts of the Persian Gulf states.

3. Onion paratha :

i often make different type of parathas at home but many of these paratha recipes are not posted on blog. so i have decided to post these paratha recipes one by one.parathas can be had for breakfast or a quick brunch or lunch. accompanied with a side vegetable dish or raita these parathas make for a complete meal.as far as onion paratha is concerned it is very easy to make. on top of it, onions are easily available in any kitchen and more so in an indian kitchen. onions are always there in my kitchen, except on days when we fast and abstain from onion & garlic.

4. Red meat :

In gastronomy, red meat is darker-colored meat, as contrasted with white meat. The exact definition varies by time, place, and culture, but the meat from adult mammals such as sheep, and horses is invariably considered red, while chicken and rabbit meat is invariably considered white. The meat of young mammals such as milk-fed veal calves, sheep, and pigs is traditionally considered white; while the meat of duck and goose is considered red.

5. Gajar Ka Halwa :

Gajar Ka Halwa is a sweet dessert pudding associated mainly with the state of Punjab in India & Pakistan. It is made by placing grated carrot in a pot containing a specific amount of water, milk and sugar and then cooking while stirring regularly. It is often served with a garnish of almonds and pistachios. The nuts and other items used are first saut

6. Chole Bhature :

chole bhature is one of the most popular punjabi recipe which is now liked almost all over india and even abroad. chole stands for a spicy curry made with white chickpeas and bhatura is fried leavened flat bread.chole bhature is a spicy, tasty and a heavy dish. i have eaten this dish at many places in punjab and delhi. each restaurants or dhabas have their own flavors and taste in the chole. in some places it is very spicy, at other places it has tangy taste and the consistency of the curry also varies from slightly thick to semi-dry and dry.this recipe of chole has spicy flavors. this is my moms recipe of chole and unlike other versions of chole recipes posted on the blog, this one has a homely taste and flavor. it does not taste like the restaurant or dhaba versions but taste very good. if you are looking for restaurants versions of chole recipe then you can also check punjabi chole and amritsari chole recipe to go along with bhature.

7. Meethi Roti :

Nariyal ki meethi roti is a variation of the evergreen delight puran poli, made with wheat flour and a slightly modified stuffing. Adding a little salt to the dough helps to enhance the sweetness of the stuffing. You can vary the amounts of nutmeg and sugar as per your taste.