Nirmala October 1, 2017

1. Makai ki Roti :

Kneed the atta with water, keep aside for rest, until it is firm, then make a roti out of it and bake it till golden.

2. Pakora :

Among the Muslim Cape Malays of South Africa, pakoras are known as dhaltjies, and are usually eaten as an appetizer during iftar, or as appetizers for weddings, births, or similar occasions.
In southern states of India, such preparations are known as bajji rather than pakora. Usually the name of the vegetable that is deep fried is suffixed with bajji. For instance, potato bajji is sliced potato wrapped in batter and deep fried. In such states, pakoda is taken to mean a mix of finely cut onions, green chillies and spices mixed in gram flour. This is rolled into small balls or sprinkled straight in hot oil and fried. These pakodas are very crisp on the outside and medium soft to crisp inside. There is also a variety that is softer overall, usually termed medhu pakoda in restaurants, that is made of any other ingredients, such as potatoes.Pakoras are popular across Pakistan, where they generally resemble those found in India. They are sometimes served in a yoghurt based curry (salan), as a main dish, pakora kari, rather than as separate snacks. In this case the pakoras are generally doughier and are made of chopped potato, onion and chili mixed into the batter, instead of individual fried vegetable slices.

3. Date palm :

Is a palm in the genus Phoenix, cultivated for its edible sweet fruit. Although its place of origin is unknown because of long cultivation, it probably originated from lands around the Persian Gulf. The species is widely cultivated and is reportedly naturalized in Australia, Spain, North Africa, the Canary Islands, Madeira, Cape Verde, the Sahel region of Africa, Mauritius, R

4. Chutney :

Chutney (also transliterated chatney or chatni) is a family of condiments mainly associated with South Asian cuisine that usually contain some mixture of spice(s), vegetable(s), and/or fruit(s). There are many varieties of chutney. Chutneys may be either wet or dry, and can have a coarse to a fine texture. The Indian word refers to fresh and pickled preparations indiscriminately, with preserves often sweetened. Several Indian languages use the word for fresh preparations only. A different word ach?r applies to preserves that often contain oil and are rarely sweet. Vinegar, citrus, tamarind, or lemon juice may be added as natural preservatives, or fermentation in the presence of salt may be used to create acid.The name chutney covers a wide variety of foodstuffs. The common element which makes them all chutneys is that they are added to meals to add flavour; the best English translation of chutney is relish. As such, they can be, and are, eaten with a wide variety of foods.

5. Kofta :

Kofta (see section Name for other names) is an Iranian, Middle Eastern, Indian and Balkan meatball or meatloaf. In the simplest form, koftas consist of balls of minced or ground meat usually beef or lamb mixed with spices and/or onions. In India, Turkey and Iran, koftas are usually made of lamb, beef, mutton or chicken, whereas Greek and Cypriot varieties are usually made of beef, veal, pork or mixtures of them. They are often shaped into meatballs which are prepared with a mixture of ground meat, rice and leeks, and served dry. In India, vegetarian varieties, like lauki kofta and shahi aloo kofta, are popular, as religious beliefs generally forbid consumption of meat. In Iran, Balochistan and Pakistan, koftas are served with a spiced gravy, as dry versions are considered to be kebabs. Shrimp and fish koftas are found in South India, West Bengal, Bangladesh and in some parts of the Persian Gulf states.

6. Panipuri :

The Panipuri , pani ke bataashe, Marathi: term used in Western India, phuchkainox is a popular street snack in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Nepal. It consists of a round, hollow puri, fried crisp and filled with a mixture of flavored water (pani), tamarind chutney, chili, chaat masala, potato, onion and chickpeas. It is generally small enough to fit completely into ones mouth. It is a popular street food dish in Mumbai, Kolkata, Delhi, Lucknow, Karachi, Lahore, Chittagong, Dhaka and Kathmandu.

7. Dahi vada :

Dahi vada (also known as Dahi Bhalla in Punjabi and Urdu, Thayir Vadai in Tamil, Thayir Vada in Malayalam, Perugu Vada in Telugu, Mosaru Vade in Kannada, Dahi Bara in Oriya and Doi Bora in Bengali) is an Indian chaat, prepared by soaking vadas in thick dahi (yogurt).[citation needed] The hot deep fried vadas are first put in water and then transferred to thick beaten yogurt. For best results, the vadas are soaked for at least a couple of hours before serving. To add more flavor, they may be topped with coriander or mint leaves, chili powder, crushed black pepper, chaat masala, cumin, shredded coconut, green chilis or boondi. Sweeter curd is preferred in some places in India, especially in Maharashtra and Gujarat, although the garnishing remains the same. A combination of coriander and tamarind chutneys are often used as garnishments in addition to those mentioned above.