Nirmala May 16, 2018

1. Petha :

Petha is a translucent soft candy from North India and Pakistan (Punjab region and metros). Usually rectangular or cylindrical, it is made from the ash gourd vegetable (also known as winter melon or white pumpkin, or simply petha in Hindi and Urdu).With growing demand and innovation, more varieties of the original preparation are available. Many flavoured variants are available, e.g. Kesar Petha, Angoori Petha etc. There are some other variations based on content, one with coconut mixed, another with some nuts put into it. Sometimes kewda essence is used to flavor petha.

2. Chutney :

Chutney (also transliterated chatney or chatni) is a family of condiments mainly associated with South Asian cuisine that usually contain some mixture of spice(s), vegetable(s), and/or fruit(s). There are many varieties of chutney. Chutneys may be either wet or dry, and can have a coarse to a fine texture. The Indian word refers to fresh and pickled preparations indiscriminately, with preserves often sweetened. Several Indian languages use the word for fresh preparations only. A different word ach?r applies to preserves that often contain oil and are rarely sweet. Vinegar, citrus, tamarind, or lemon juice may be added as natural preservatives, or fermentation in the presence of salt may be used to create acid.The name chutney covers a wide variety of foodstuffs. The common element which makes them all chutneys is that they are added to meals to add flavour; the best English translation of chutney is relish. As such, they can be, and are, eaten with a wide variety of foods.

3. Gulab jamun :

Gulab jamun is a milk-solids -based dessert, similar to a dumpling, popular in countries of the South Asian Subcontinent such as India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Pakistan and Bangladesh, also in the Caribbean countries of Trinidad, Guyana, Suriname and Jamaica and in Mauritius. In Nepal it is widely known as Lal-Mohan, served with or without yogurt. It is made mainly from milk solids, traditionally from freshly curdled milk. In India, milk solids are prepared by heating milk over a low flame for a long time until most of the water content has evaporated. These milks solids, known as khoya in Pakistan and India, are kneaded into a dough, sometimes with a pinch of flour, and then shaped into small balls and deep fried at a low temperature of about 148

4. Laung Latta :

If you have lived any time in India, you will know that milk is one of the base ingredients for sweets made here. In fact, milk is one of the main ingredients in curd yogurt and As the business card states, taste & profession is our passion. That is certainly true at Ksheer Sagar located on the Godowlia – Assi road in Sonarpura. It is one of the best places to buy sweets in Varanasi. They recently remodeled the shop to include a spacious glass enclosed interior. I like to get the yogurt poured into unfired clay bowls. They come in two sizes and two tastes–a normal sweetened yogurt and a pistachio sweetened yogurt. Of course you can also get all the main Indian sweets at Ksheer Sagar such as gulab jamun, jalebi and assorted barf. Drop on by some time and youll notice that the shop remains crowded–proof that whats written on the card is what is really offered!

5. Dahi vada :

Dahi vada (also known as Dahi Bhalla in Punjabi and Urdu, Thayir Vadai in Tamil, Thayir Vada in Malayalam, Perugu Vada in Telugu, Mosaru Vade in Kannada, Dahi Bara in Oriya and Doi Bora in Bengali) is an Indian chaat, prepared by soaking vadas in thick dahi (yogurt).[citation needed] The hot deep fried vadas are first put in water and then transferred to thick beaten yogurt. For best results, the vadas are soaked for at least a couple of hours before serving. To add more flavor, they may be topped with coriander or mint leaves, chili powder, crushed black pepper, chaat masala, cumin, shredded coconut, green chilis or boondi. Sweeter curd is preferred in some places in India, especially in Maharashtra and Gujarat, although the garnishing remains the same. A combination of coriander and tamarind chutneys are often used as garnishments in addition to those mentioned above.

6. Halva :

Halva (halawa, alva, haleweh, halava, helava, helva, halwa, halua, aluva, chalva) refers to many types of dense, sweet confections, served across the Middle East, South Asia, Central Asia, West Asia, North Africa, the Horn of Africa, the Balkans, Central Europe, Eastern Europe, Malta and the Jewish world.

7. Meethi Roti :

Nariyal ki meethi roti is a variation of the evergreen delight puran poli, made with wheat flour and a slightly modified stuffing. Adding a little salt to the dough helps to enhance the sweetness of the stuffing. You can vary the amounts of nutmeg and sugar as per your taste.