Nirmala June 25, 2018

1. Papadum :

Papadam, pronounced as poppadum is a thin, crisp discshaped Indian food typically based on a seasoned dough made from black gram (urad flour), fried or cooked with dry heat. Flours made from other sources such as lentils, chickpeas, rice, or potato, can be used. Papadams are typically served as an accompaniment to a meal in India, or as an appetizer or snack, sometimes with toppings such as chopped onions, chopped carrots, chutneys or other dips and condiments. In certain parts of India, papadums which have been dried but not precooked are used in curries and vegetable dishes.

2. Mango pickle :

Mango pickle refers to a variety of pickles prepared using mango. This is a very popular pickle in South Asia and India. These sometimes spicy pickles are also available commercially.

3. Gulab Jamun :

These are small balls which are prepared from Mava and then wrapped in wheat flour to be fried in pure ghee. Once the balls turn golden brown, they are ready to be dropped in sugar syrup for added taste.

4. Bhajji :

Bhajji or bhaji is a spicy Indian snack similar to pakora or potato fritters, with several variants. It is usually used as a topping on various Indian meals but has become popular to eat alone as a nack.[citation needed] It is a popular street food in Maharashtra, India and can be found for sale in streetside stalls, especially in dhabas on highways.Apart from being a must in the traditional Maharashtrian Hindu meal on festivals and the like, bhajjis top the comfort food list when it comes to monsoons and rains. They are generally served with a piping hot cup of coffee, tea or a traditional serving of Yameen.

5. Peda :

Peda, Pheda or Pera is a sweet from the Indian subcontinent, usually prepared in thick, semisoft pieces. The main ingredients are khoa, sugar and traditional flavorings, including cardamom seeds, pistachio nuts and saffron. The colour varies from a creamy white to a caramel colour. The word pera is also generically used to mean a blob of any doughy substance, such as flour or (in the case of the sweet) khoa. Origin of Peda may be credited to the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, and the variety from the city of Mathura in that state was considered to be the best. Simultaneously, another origin, practice of Peda making, some unique varieties, and spread of this tradition may be attributed to the province of Saurashtra of Gujarat and its centers like Sihor, Rajkot, Palitana and Bhavnagar as well. Tradition and practice of Peda making can be traced back to late 1800s in Sihor while it picking up momentum in 20th century. Along with Rajkot and Bhavnagar now, there are several distinct varieties of Peda, originating from different centres of Saurashtra (region). In Gujarat, Pedas are called and pronounced as Penda

6. Misa Mach Poora :

Uncooked shrimps are required to prepare this dish These shrimps are greased in banana leafs.It is prepared in mustard oil and water with coriander,peppercorns

7. Thukpa :

Thukpa is a Tibetan noodle soup, inspired from China. It originated in the eastern part of Tibet. Amdo Thukpa (especially Thenthuk) is famous among Tibetan and Nepalese people. Later it became popular in Bhutan, and in the states of Sikkim, Ladakh, Arunachal Pradesh, and some other parts of India. The food is widely available in these regions. There are numerous varieties of Thukpa in Tibetan tradition, including.