Nirmala December 2, 2020

1. Dahi vada :

Dahi vada (also known as Dahi Bhalla in Punjabi and Urdu, Thayir Vadai in Tamil, Thayir Vada in Malayalam, Perugu Vada in Telugu, Mosaru Vade in Kannada, Dahi Bara in Oriya and Doi Bora in Bengali) is an Indian chaat, prepared by soaking vadas in thick dahi (yogurt).[citation needed] The hot deep fried vadas are first put in water and then transferred to thick beaten yogurt. For best results, the vadas are soaked for at least a couple of hours before serving. To add more flavor, they may be topped with coriander or mint leaves, chili powder, crushed black pepper, chaat masala, cumin, shredded coconut, green chilis or boondi. Sweeter curd is preferred in some places in India, especially in Maharashtra and Gujarat, although the garnishing remains the same. A combination of coriander and tamarind chutneys are often used as garnishments in addition to those mentioned above.

2. Sev Mamra :

Sev Mamra (mumra) is an Indian snack. It is a mixture of spicy dry ingredients such as puffed rice, savoury noodles (sev) and peanuts. It is a very light yet healthy dish.Regional variation of the snack varies by adding capsicum, onions, or pickled mangos.It is available in most parts of India, though it is known by different names in different regions.

3. Maharashtrian Puran Poli :

Puran poli is a classical Marathi dish, which is a dessert served during auspicious occasions and during important festivals such as Holi, Padwa in Maharashtra. Although it resembles like a roti, a poli is actually very different. It is made mostly during holi when the bonfire is lit. The stuffing is known as puran and the outer cover is known as poli. The puran is made by boiling chickpea lentils with a pinch of turmeric for color. When the lentils are cooked and soft, the broth is removed and kept aside.Jaggery is added to the chickpeas and cooked till they are soft. Then the stuffing is removed and sieved through a utensil made specifically for puran to achieve a smoother consistency. Saffron, cardamom, and nutmeg is added for additional flavor. The outer cover is made by making a dough by mixing refined flour, milk and ghee. Equal number of balls are made of the dough as well as the stuffing. The puran is stuffed inside the dough and then rolled out flat using a rolling pin. The poli is then cooked on a hot griddle and served with ghee and a soup made from the syurp.The stuffing is cooled to room temperature. Meanwhile, the outer dough is prepared. A very soft, rubbery dough is prepared by kneading polished wheat-flour with a little water and a large amount of oil. This is left soaked in oil for a few hours.

4. Kachori :

Kachori or Kachauri or Kachodi or Katchuri is a spicy snack popular in various parts of India including Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Delhi, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, Bengal and Orissa. It is a popular snack food in Karachi, Pakistan.

5. Muthia :

Muthia is an example of Indian food. The name is derived from the way it is made, from the gripping action of the hand. It resembles sausage, but is a vegan dish. It is made up of Chickpea flour, Methi (Fenugreek), Salt, Turmeric, Chili powder, and an optional bonding agent/sweetener such as sugar and oil. It is a very good staple of Gujaratis. This dish is supposed to be good for keeping bowel movement regular, because it includes fenugreek. This dish can be eaten steamed or fried (after steaming); it is equally tasty either way. The following link gives information about preparation of this dish.This item is known as Vaataa in Charotar area located in Central Gujarat. Other varieties are made by using coarse flour of wheat and leafy vegetables such as amaranth, spinach, Luni or grated bottle gourd or peel of bitter gourd(karela) After steamed, they are tempered with sesame seeds and mustered seeds. Very yummy.

6. Biranj :

Vermicelli cooked in milk and sugar and flavoured with cardamom and saffron. Wash the rice and spread it out on a clean cloth. Soak the dal for two hours, drain and spread out to dry.
Pour the ghee into a heavy vessel and place on the fire. Put in the cloves, and when they fluff out, add the cinnamon. Next, add rice, and roast till very light brown.Add the dal and reduce heat Keep ready 2 cups of boiling water. and add to the rice and dal. Cover and cook on a slow fire for 10 minutes. Add sugar and saffron, and stir gently. Cover and stir every few minutes so that the rice does not stick to the bottom of the vessel. When the ghee separates, remove from fire, and sprinkle over with powdered cardamom.

7. Pilaf :

Pilaf (also known as pilav, pilau, plov, pulao, polu and palaw) is a dish in which rice is cooked in a seasoned broth. In some cases, the rice may also attain its brown color by being stirred with bits of cooked onion, as well as a large mix of spices. Depending on the local cuisine, it may also contain meat, fish, vegetables, and (dried) fruits. Pilaf and similar dishes are common to Balkan, Middle Eastern, Caucasian, Central and South Asian, East African, North Indian, Latin American and Caribbean cuisines. It is a staple food and a national dish in Afghan, Bukharan Jewish, Swahili, Uzbek, and Tajik cuisines.