Nirmala September 19, 2018

1. Kofta :

Kofta (see section Name for other names) is an Iranian, Middle Eastern, Indian and Balkan meatball or meatloaf. In the simplest form, koftas consist of balls of minced or ground meat usually beef or lamb mixed with spices and/or onions. In India, Turkey and Iran, koftas are usually made of lamb, beef, mutton or chicken, whereas Greek and Cypriot varieties are usually made of beef, veal, pork or mixtures of them. They are often shaped into meatballs which are prepared with a mixture of ground meat, rice and leeks, and served dry. In India, vegetarian varieties, like lauki kofta and shahi aloo kofta, are popular, as religious beliefs generally forbid consumption of meat. In Iran, Balochistan and Pakistan, koftas are served with a spiced gravy, as dry versions are considered to be kebabs. Shrimp and fish koftas are found in South India, West Bengal, Bangladesh and in some parts of the Persian Gulf states.

2. Paratha :

A paratha/parantha/parauntha is a flatbread that originated in the Indian Subcontinent. It is still quite prevalent throughout the area. Parantha is an amalgamation of the words parat and atta which literally means layers of cooked dough. In Burma, it is known as palata while it is known as farata in Mauritius and the Maldives. However, in areas of the Punjabi region, it is referred to as prontha or parontay.It is one of the most popular unleavened flat breads in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent and is made by pan frying whole wheat dough on a tava. The parantha dough usually contains ghee or cooking oil which is also layered on the freshly prepared paratha. Paranthas are usually stuffed with boiled potatoes (as in aloo ka parantha), leaf vegetables, radishes, cauliflower, and/or paneer (Cottagecheese). A parantha (especially a stuffed one) can be eaten simply with a pat of butter spread on top, with chutney, pickles, and yogurt, or with meat or vegetable curries. Some roll the parantha into a tube and eat it with tea, often dipping the parantha.

3. Kaju Katli :

Kaju katli (also known as Kaju Katari or Kaju barfi) is an Indian dessert similar to a barfi. Kaju means cashew nut in Hindi. Barfi is often but not always, made by thickening milk with sugar and other ingredients (dry fruits and mild spices). The kaju barfi recipe that include saffron and is known as kesar kaju katli. The kesar version of this sweet dish is considered to be more exotic and rich.It is an expensive dessert as compared to its counterparts.

4. Chutney :

Chutney (also transliterated chatney or chatni) is a family of condiments mainly associated with South Asian cuisine that usually contain some mixture of spice(s), vegetable(s), and/or fruit(s). There are many varieties of chutney. Chutneys may be either wet or dry, and can have a coarse to a fine texture. The Indian word refers to fresh and pickled preparations indiscriminately, with preserves often sweetened. Several Indian languages use the word for fresh preparations only. A different word ach?r applies to preserves that often contain oil and are rarely sweet. Vinegar, citrus, tamarind, or lemon juice may be added as natural preservatives, or fermentation in the presence of salt may be used to create acid.The name chutney covers a wide variety of foodstuffs. The common element which makes them all chutneys is that they are added to meals to add flavour; the best English translation of chutney is relish. As such, they can be, and are, eaten with a wide variety of foods.

5. shikanji :

Shikanjvi is a type of traditional limeade or lemonade from North India and Pakistan, especially prevalent in (both Indian and Pakistani) Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, Jammu and Kashmir, Haryana, Western Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Gujarat, Maharashtra and Sindh

6. Roti :

Roti is generally an Indian bread, made from stoneground wholemeal flour, traditionally known as atta flour, that originated and is consumed in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. It is also consumed in parts of South Africa, the southern Caribbean, particularly in Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, and Suriname, and Fiji. Its defining characteristic is that it is unleavened. Indian naan bread, by contrast, is a yeastleavened bread. A kulcha in Indian cuisine is a breadlike accompaniment, made of processed flour (Maida) leavened with yeast.

7. Samosa Chaat :

Chaat is a popular Indian savory snack available in several variations. It is spicy, tangy and sweet and a popular street food in India.Samosa Chaat is served by adding a plate full of peas or chole masala, mashed samosa with freshly cut veggie toppings and a dash of lemon goodness.