Nirmala September 25, 2017

1. Paturi :

Generally oily fish is sliced evenly, and then wrapped in a banana leaf, after the fish has been hit by a basting of freshly pasted mustard with a hint of mustard oil, chili, turmeric and salt.

2. Chhenchki :

Tiny pieces of one or more vegetable, generally a dice of vegetables along with general odds and ends, often even the peels (of potatoes, squash, gourd, pumpkin, bitter gourd, or potol for example) usually flavoured with pachpouron, whole mustard seeds or kalo jira. Chopped shallot and garlic can also be used, but hardly any ground spices.

3. Achar :

Pickles. Generally flavoured with mustard oil, mustard seeds, aniseed, caraway seed and asafoetida, or hing.

4. JhalMui :

One of the most popular and iconic snack foods of Bengal, jhal literally means hot or spicy. Jhalmu?i is puffed rice with spices, vegetables and raw mustard oil. Depending on what is added, there are many kinds of jhalmu?i but the most common is a bhrta made of chopped onion, jira roasted ground cumin, bitnoon black salt lngka / morich chilis (either kacha ripe or shukna dried), mustard oil, and dhone pata (fresh coriander leaves). and ( mudhi ) also.

5. Bawra :

Anything that has been mashed and then formed into rough roundish shape and fried, generally in mustard oil. Generally served with rice as a starter, or served with puffed rice crisps as a snack. The baora actually has quite a few different kinds. When potatoes are fried in a light chickpea flour batter, they are called fuluri (giving rise to the Trinidadian pholourie)

6. Saag :

The first course is then followed by saag (leafy vegetables) such as spinach, palong chard, methi fenugreek, or amaranth. The saag can be steamed or cooked in oil with other vegetables such as begun (aubergine). Steamed saag is sometimes accompanied by a sharp paste of mustard and raw mango pulp called Kashundi.

7. Rasmalai :

Ras malai is composed of white, cream, or yellow cloured balls of paneer which are dipped and soaked in sugar and malai or cottage cheese. This dessert resemble the rasgulla greatly. Though it is not a primarily Bengali sweet and originated from other places, Ras Malai is still very popular.