Nirmala March 20, 2018

1. Khichdi :

Khich?? alternate spellings khichdi, khichri, khichdee, khichadi, khichuri, khichari, kitcheree, kitchree, and many other variants, is a South Asian preparation made from rice and lentils (dal). Khichri is commonly considered to be a comfort food, and was the inspiration for the Anglo-Indian dish kedgeree. Khichri is also thought to be the inspiration for the popular Egyptian dish, Kushari. Khichdi has no relation with the Keralite dish kichadi.

2. Panipuri :

The Panipuri is a popular street snack in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Nepal. It consists of a round, hollow puri, fried crisp and filled with a mixture of flavored water (pani), tamarind chutney, chili, chaat masala, potato, onion and chickpeas. It is generally small enough to fit completely into one s mouth. It is a popular street food dish in Mumbai, Kolkata, Delhi, Lucknow, Karachi, Lahore, Chittagong, Dhaka and Kathmandu. In North India it is known as Gol Gappa. The name gol gappa refers to the crisp sphere (gol) that is placed in the mouth and eaten (gappa) one at a time. Pani comes from the Hindi word for water and puri (or poori) is the name of an Indian bread made by deep frying in oil. Dogras, Kashmiris, Bhaderwahis, Gujjars, Paharis, Ladakhis, Himachalis of North India called it Gol Gappa . It is known as bataasha in the Western region of Uttar Pradesh. Bataasha is something which gets smashed with application of a slight pressure; the bataasha gets smashed as soon as it is placed inside the mouth. It is known as Phuchka in Eastern Indian states like Bihar, Jharkhand and West Bengal, also in Bangladesh. Because of the bursting sound in the mouth when it is eaten, called gup chup in Odisha,Hyderabad and South Jharkhand. Gol-Gappa or Pani Pataase in Madhya Pradesh, Gup-Chup or Gol-Gappa or Panipuri in Chhattisgarh. In several parts of Gujarat and Kutch. It is commonly known as pakodi, not to be confused with pakoda.

3. Kansar :

Kansar is a sweet dessert dish from the Gujarat in Indian subcontinent, whose main ingredients are cracked wheat and jaggery. Serving Kansar to guests is considered a sign of respect in Gujarati culture, and the dish plays a part in traditional wedding ceremonies.

4. Fafda :

Fafda is a traditional crunchy snack that is synonymous with Gujarati cuisine. Made of gram flour and other spices, it is a convenient and quick snacking option that can be had at anytime of the day or mixed with other dry snacks like puffed rice.

5. Paratha :

A paratha/parantha/parauntha is a flatbread that originated in the Indian Subcontinent. It is still quite prevalent throughout the area. Parantha is an amalgamation of the words parat and atta which literally means layers of cooked dough. In Burma, it is known as palata while it is known as farata in Mauritius and the Maldives. However, in areas of the Punjabi region, it is referred to as prontha or parontay.It is one of the most popular unleavened flat breads in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent and is made by pan frying whole wheat dough on a tava. The parantha dough usually contains ghee or cooking oil which is also layered on the freshly prepared paratha. Paranthas are usually stuffed with boiled potatoes (as in aloo ka parantha), leaf vegetables, radishes, cauliflower, and/or paneer (Cottage-cheese). A parantha (especially a stuffed one) can be eaten simply with a pat of butter spread on top, with chutney, pickles, and yogurt, or with meat or vegetable curries. Some roll the parantha into a tube and eat it with tea, often dipping the parantha.

6. Adadiya :

Adadiya is famous Gujarati Winter special sweet. Adadiya is traditional Katchi and Kathiyawadi sweet. There are many ingredients in Adadiya which helps to keep body warm during winter.

7. Kadhi :

Kadhi or karhi is a North Indian dish. It is a spicy dish whose thick gravy is based on chickpea flour (called Besan in Hindi and Urdu) and contains vegetable fritters called pakoras, to which sour yogurt is added to give it little sour taste. It is often eaten with boiled rice or roti. Among the Sindhi people, a different variety is popular and often vegetables are also added.