Nirmala November 27, 2017

1. Chutney :

Chutney (also transliterated chatney or chatni) is a family of condiments mainly associated with South Asian cuisine that usually contain some mixture of spice(s), vegetable(s), and/or fruit(s). There are many varieties of chutney. Chutneys may be either wet or dry, and can have a coarse to a fine texture. The Indian word refers to fresh and pickled preparations indiscriminately, with preserves often sweetened. Several Indian languages use the word for fresh preparations only. A different word ach?r applies to preserves that often contain oil and are rarely sweet. Vinegar, citrus, tamarind, or lemon juice may be added as natural preservatives, or fermentation in the presence of salt may be used to create acid.The name chutney covers a wide variety of foodstuffs. The common element which makes them all chutneys is that they are added to meals to add flavour; the best English translation of chutney is relish. As such, they can be, and are, eaten with a wide variety of foods.

2. Bonda :

Bonda is a typical South Indian snack that has various sweet and spicy versions of it at different regions.

3. Chaat :

Chaat is a term describing savory snacks, typically served at road-side tracks from stalls or food carts in India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh. With its origins in Uttar Pradesh, chaat has become immensely popular in the rest of South Asia. The word derives from Hindi c?? (tasting, a delicacy), from c??n? (to lick), from Prakrit ca??ei (to devour with relish, eat noisily).

4. Samosa :

A samosa is a fried or baked pastry with savory filling, such as spiced potatoes, onions, peas, lentils and sometimes ground lamb, ground beef or ground chicken. They may or may not also contain pine nuts. Its size and consistency may vary, but typically it is distinctly triangular or tetrahedral in shape. Indian samosas are usually vegetarian, and often accompanied by a mint sauce or chutney. With its origins in Uttar Pradesh, they are a popular entree appetizer or snack in South Asia, Southeast Asia, Central Asia and Southwest Asia, the Arabian Peninsula, the Mediterranean, the Horn of Africa, North Africa and South Africa.

5. Pakora :

Among the Muslim Cape Malays of South Africa, pakoras are known as dhaltjies, and are usually eaten as an appetizer during iftar, or as appetizers for weddings, births, or similar occasions.
In southern states of India, such preparations are known as bajji rather than pakora. Usually the name of the vegetable that is deep fried is suffixed with bajji. For instance, potato bajji is sliced potato wrapped in batter and deep fried. In such states, pakoda is taken to mean a mix of finely cut onions, green chillies and spices mixed in gram flour. This is rolled into small balls or sprinkled straight in hot oil and fried. These pakodas are very crisp on the outside and medium soft to crisp inside. There is also a variety that is softer overall, usually termed medhu pakoda in restaurants, that is made of any other ingredients, such as potatoes.Pakoras are popular across Pakistan, where they generally resemble those found in India. They are sometimes served in a yoghurt based curry (salan), as a main dish, pakora kari, rather than as separate snacks. In this case the pakoras are generally doughier and are made of chopped potato, onion and chili mixed into the batter, instead of individual fried vegetable slices.

6. Til Barfi :

Til Barfi is one of those yummy desserts that is exclusively prepared during the time of Makar Sankranti. The state of Jharkhand as well as Maharashtra take great pride in Til Barfi as one of its most scrumptious and nutritive delicacies. Til Barfi in Jharkhand, is also prepared during other occasions as well. One thing is for sure, after getting a taste of this mind-boggling delicacy called Til Barfi of Jharkhand, you will be left with a desire to have more.

7. Panipuri :

The Panipuri , pani ke bataashe, Marathi: term used in Western India, phuchkainox is a popular street snack in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Nepal. It consists of a round, hollow puri, fried crisp and filled with a mixture of flavored water (pani), tamarind chutney, chili, chaat masala, potato, onion and chickpeas. It is generally small enough to fit completely into ones mouth. It is a popular street food dish in Mumbai, Kolkata, Delhi, Lucknow, Karachi, Lahore, Chittagong, Dhaka and Kathmandu.